DWA Set of Rules

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Technical Rules and Standards

Technical rules and standards are a major aspect of the DWA’s work. Meanwhile more than 150 Standards and Advisory Guidelines have been translated and their recommendations have been followed with great success outside Germany.

DWA Set of Rules on CD ROM

DWA Set of Rules

The CD-ROM "DWA Set of Rules", Edition April 2016, contains 52 DWA Standards and Guidelines, 6 DWA Topics and various brochures in pdf format.

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What is the DWA Set of Rules?

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DWA Set of Rules

Technical standards are an important factor in efficaciously and economically protecting the environment and material goods and in promoting quality assurance. The DWA therfore incorporates into its standards the most recent findings on time-tested procedures. The German DWA Set of Rules consists of Standards and Advisory Guidelines and is prepared by more than 1600 specialists, who are engaged in the association in an honorary capacity and work in more than 260 specialist committees and working groups.

The DWA Set of Rules is viewed in Germany as the general basis for planning, construction and operation of plants in water, wastewater and waste management, as well as in soil conservation. It makes a considerable contribution to keeping the cost of environmental protection at a reasonable level. With this Set of Rules, the associations assume individual responsibility for their specific areas of expertise and unburden the state to a considerable extent: it should be noted that the DIN standards and the rules and standards of the DWA are of equal importance.


In the DWA main committees, the related sub-committees and the vast number of working groups, an extensive range of topics are dealt with. In addition to the topics frequently discussed in the media, such as the refurbishment of sewage systems, treatment of sewage sludge or watershed management, there are many other questions to be answered that do not always arouse the interest of the general public. For example, experts deal with low water levels, wastewater from photographic laboratories, pipe structures, river embankments, wastewater treatment in agricultural areas and soil conservation. The DWA’s comprehensive Set of Rules could not have been put together without the untiring cooperation of voluntary experts. There are at present more than 1600 experts from different disciplines engaged in the work of around 280 specialist committees on a voluntary basis, and if this number were to be spread over the fifty years, this total would certainly be more than 20,000 experts, technicians, engineers and researchers. These people have invested a considerable share of their knowledge and leisure time to the creation of the DWA Set of Rules. What had started on a small scale has been organised into ten main committees (at present) and their sub-committees and working groups and includes, with the exception of drinking water provision, the entire area covered by water management.